épisode 16 streaming | Halloween H20 – 20 Anos Depois1998 HD/DUB | Học Mèo Kêu (学猫叫)

Troy Patterson

Select another critic »
For 252 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Troy Patterson's Scores

Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Planet Earth: Blue Planet II
Lowest review score: 0 Roseanne's Nuts: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 252
252 tv reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Troy Patterson
    Three episodes into this seven-part season, it remains unclear what all this horrible awkwardness and explosions of bowels add up to--how much art can be found in the squicky craft of an evil clown.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    Where [Sally4Ever's] Sally’s crisis outrageously flowers into absurdity, Leila’s is the basis for a droll study of friendship and desire, with tenderness in its millennial moping, and emotional depth to its embarrassing emotional pratfalls.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    Season 1 of Homecoming supplies two fine roles to Julia Roberts--or, rather, one superb role, that of the disappointed American hero Heidi Bergman, on two time lines. ... Every episode of Homecoming, each crisp half-hour installment, is a compact exploitation film, spinning an anxious yarn about systematic abuse.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    The showrunner, Mike Flanagan, builds a dreadful atmosphere, which is crucial, because the creeping pace of his ten episodes would be intolerable if not for its ambient suspense. The show may work best as a binge watch, one where you don’t pay steady attention but instead let it haunt your own house.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    Sabrina is also possessed by the spirit of Kevin Williamson’s script for Wes Craven’s “Scream”: there’s a giddy cleverness in how it shouts out its own tropes and knowing riffs, in the service of minting a Faustian coming-of-age tale in which the retro atmosphere mingles with progressive gender politics.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    Collette happens to be excellent, but to enjoy her performance in full, you must accept without judgment that her character, whose true struggle is to confront grief, is named Joy. The actual writing is rarely so unsubtle, except when Payne yields the floor to earnest speechifying about carnal needs and emotional desires.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    Dinklage catches the character’s anger, self-pity, and, most importantly, his exuberant recklessness. ... My Dinner with Hervé cannot make a straight-faced claim that Villechaize was an important actor or significant cultural figure, so its own significance depends on the star’s charisma, which lends the proceedings a simple poignance.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    It is thrilling, with wit as gentle as a chainsaw. The network has toned down the finale by cutting the prom-bombing climax, and replacing it with nothing much. The show fizzles in the home stretch, but it is easy to imagine a showrunner’s cut of “Heathers” that fills it out as a pop-surrealist masterpiece. ... The show is painfully sharp in its portrayal of the way grief is performed on social media and I.R.L. It is similarly brutal in its lampooning of national deformities.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Troy Patterson
    The characters gripe about aging and its indignities, with Corky Sherwood, the Miss America alumna (played by Faith Ford), unsettled by menopause, for instance. Her jokes about hot flashes are so dated that they seem plucked from the original show’s discarded drafts.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Troy Patterson
    In the new reboot (with Jay Hernandez in the title role, and without that starchy appositive comma in the title), Magnum is a generic, chill dude with an aggro streak. ... The series is ungainly in its rush to get Magnum and Higgins together as a fondly squabbling couple, and it’s uncertain whether the stars share the chemistry to sell a Benedick-and-Beatrice routine, but they sail through the fight scenes just fine.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    Downbeat but uplifting, the series is less a sci-fi thriller than a character study. Like its star--Sean Penn, who here does a lot of muscular brooding--the show promises solemn rumination, and more often achieves an earnest heaviosity.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Troy Patterson
    Grace’s performance is the only element of the film that seems campy by intent--she is delightful as a tyke who sets a murderous scheme in motion and then kicks back with a juice box. ... A taste for in-jokes may indicate the film’s cognizance that it cannot be taken too seriously. ... [Lowe] is merely coasting along as a heartthrob emeritus.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Troy Patterson
    Through the four episodes (of the season’s ten) screened by this critic, Kidding has yet to manifest a coherent tone. The frank jocularity of the wisecracks bumps up against rogue jolts of cutesiness and a slightly dirty realism, familiar from Sundance dramedies. ... One also wants to attribute the slow-boil mood and occasional low-key tone of Carrey’s strong performance to Gondry.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    [John Krasinksi’s] affable modesty helps to sell Ryan’s grace-under-pressure heroics, as when his game face collapses into jitters after he coolly kills a terrorist. Elsewhere, he seems incongruously cuddly. ... The series proceeds with the squareness and solidity of a CBS procedural, but one graced with the luxuries of an HBO budget.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    When the action takes us to Norway, where pearlescent clouds conjure the sullenness of Scandinavian noir, The Innocents tends to grow maddeningly stagnant, as if the show had built in longueurs for the convenience of viewers itching to divert their attention to other screens. In England, where Harry and June find time for soul-searching chats on casual strolls while fleeing both Steinar and their parents, its easy tempo feels more purposeful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    Playing against the seriousness and self-glorification of so much sword-clanging fantasy, it makes the most of slapstick pestilence and the absurdist misery of peasants, revisiting history as farce. The scenes are quick and punchy, yet the episodes, unfolding serially, are long and sometimes sluggish. ... The season is perhaps most satisfying if consumed in a binge, so that its questing convolutions feel like the motions of a languorous epic.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    Insatiable is excitingly preposterous. ... That there is a high degree of difficulty to the comic twistedness of such developments goes toward the nerve of the series’ creator, Lauren Gussis, whose confidence seems winning as long as the pace keeps up (and misplaced when episodes grow slack with meandering scenarios and repetitious dialogue).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    The shaggy-doggedness of the story line is impressive given the paucity of plot. As if striving to keep calm enough to meditate, Lodge 49 achieves a freakishly leisurely pace. It’s slow to develop and quick to linger on sadness and frustration. There’s a warmth in all this dawdling, as if its ingratiating characters are extending fellowship.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    I came to this show to hoot at the motifs of its subgenre--the sham glamour of photo shoots, the cornball lines lobbed at pitch meetings--and stayed for its amiable exploration of self-discovery. The uplift of The Bold Type is disarming.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    The twelve new episodes are slightly snappier than earlier ones, which sometimes allowed silences to speak of easy companionship or productive awkwardness. But the fundamental structure abides: Jerry and his passenger drive around, hang out, grab a bite to eat, and enact a chummy discourse on topics ranging from the philosophy of humor to theories of everyday life. It’s nonnutritive, but it has some pep.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    Because The Fourth Estate is less a documentary about the Times than a document of the struggle to report on Trump, it is--though smart and gripping--a frustrating heap of unfinished business.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Troy Patterson
    If the figure is guided by skepticism, as in the case of Sanders, the segment transforms into an endurance test of tried patience. When the subject reveals weakness and vanity, then the way forward is clear for Baron Cohen to agitate and produce savage satire.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Troy Patterson
    Four episodes in, the plenitude of incident creates an effect more like dilution than density, and it’s hard to see the trees for the forest of allusion. Castle Rock sometimes feels like a grab bag of rehashed tropes. It is freshest when its paranormality flickers with metaphors for a real world haunted by prison systems and spotted with dying small towns and plagued by sensations of outsiderness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    A suspense tale that reveals a fine drawing of an unravelled protagonist. ... Adams conjures her woundedness without sentimentality. In a performance that is raw but understated, she elicits thrills and occasions sadness, at the center of a tale about a house haunted by itself.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    It unpacks the tropes and cultural markers of the era and fondly repackages nostalgia by celebrating the enchantment of performance and the giddy adventure of amateurism.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Troy Patterson
    A series that begins as a ponderous horse opera and develops into a somewhat preposterous soap opera.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    The Joe-and-Kathy relationship in the show is an improvement on the film’s, in both plausibility and tone. ... Condor, rewiring the anxieties of classic paranoid thrillers for contemporary nervous systems, presents every citizen’s sense of isolation as the product of a state overrun with double-dealing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    The turn of events is both proportionate to the intensity of its cultural critique and appropriate to a narrative propelled by dream sequences, waking nightmares, and lavish hallucinations. Soaps suds and bloodlust mingle effervescently.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    [Logan's] rude tenacity proves to be his only quality as the season shapes up. The dynamics of the internecine struggle--the squabbles, betrayals, and ad-hoc alliances--are primal in a way that would translate to any ancient clan or provincial enterprise. But the persuasive texture of this portrait of extreme wealth is distinctly contemporary.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    The show is at its most fun when she is on the ballroom floor. I would gladly watch a whole episode devoted to her preparations for walking in a Dynasty-themed category. Pose will not deign to accommodate such frivolity, but its earnestness has its rewards.

Top Trailers